Thursday, September 11, 2008

Simplicity: Learning to love 'new' technology

Delighted to say my latest Simplicity Article is published today on Training Zone.co.uk

Click here to read the article


18 comments:

Dick Field said...

"Why are patients turning up at consultations with challenging questions for the health professionals? The answer is complex but one reason must be access to information that all human beings now have – literally at their fingertips."

We have experienced that first hand with granddaughter Lucy's doctors, even considering her rather exotic and rare conditions. One night, before her transplant, she was having yet another pulmonary vein catheterization to keep her alive. I just couldn't sit still, announced to the family I was going down to the family research center, and jumped on the computer with a great deal of natural motivation. One article I came across FROM THE UK made it clear that in such cases, transplant should be considered EARLY. That was a turning point upon which I advocated vigorously for that extreme treatment. A couple of weeks later, Lucy was in another state, awaiting transplant. There I advocated to the hospital president to have her formally listed for transplant, making use of a video of Lucy posted on YouTube!

Yes, the new technology - may have been instrumental in saving this little girls life.

Trevor Gay said...

Thank you Dick – and what a great story it has been of little Lucy. I have been privileged to be in receipt of regular email updates about Lucy’s battles since her illness was first diagnosed. That updating is also thanks to modern technology.

Lucy’s bravery and the support and strength of her family – together with prayers from all over the world – make her story as heart warming as anything I have heard in years. I am so pleased to have been a part of the communication network and how fabulous it is that she has made such amazing progress having recently celebrated her first birthday – a milestone that I’m sure you sometimes wondered if she would reach. As you have said before there seems a special role for this little girl in the grand scheme of things and as always we pray for Lucy’s continued good progress.

Best wishes from both Annie and me to you Dick and all your family and of course well done for making use of the modern technology in such an inspiring way.

Dave Wheeler said...

Trevor...I have been reading a lot lately abot the whole Boomers/Millenials/Gen Y issue. I find that much of what I read conflicts with the reality I see daily in the classroom and on the Call Center floor. You are absolutely correct that folks of any age need to embrace all things technological. It is a reality of the workplace that the millions organizations spend on technology does require these skills. I have also seen that most Boomers really have no problems learning and adapting...we just change the approach we take to teaching them these skills. The younger folks are indeed tech savvy, but we do see many are challenged with finding, interpreting,and applying information found in our knowledge tools and systems. I believe the term being used is data literacy. Again, we train a bit differently and most become proficient with questions and repetition. The changing face of the work force is also as you describe it but hey...our generation had many of the same attitudes...we just expressed them or acted on them differently. The biggest challenge and barrier to excellence is leadership. Being a Manager whose authority comes from position does/will not work. It's about a participative culture, trust, teamwork, engagement, and patience. It's not as much about the age of the leader/follower as it is about their attitude. Where I work our annual turnover is 65-70 percent annually. Attracting great folks is one challenge. Retaining the ones you have should be any organization's top strategic priority given the incalcuable costs of turnover.

Trevor Gay said...

Fascinating comments as always Dave and that turnover rate is amazing. I am sure you are right about retaining people stems from effective leadership. I know you and I share similar views of effective leadership and we also wonder why so many people just don’t seem to ‘get it’ that valuing our people - and showing them how - is where it all starts.

A funny story about the age issue; I remember probably 20 years ago when ‘online repeat prescriptions’ first became available for patients in a large town here in the UK as a pilot scheme. Research was done about which age group of patients showed the greatest uptake of the new technology – obtaining repeat medications online. Guess what? – It was the over 65 year old age group. The initial reactions of cynical managers were – as usual - to rubbish the data - because that age group is also the greatest use of repeat medication. It was then pointed out by the researchers that they had actually taken the age/usage factor into account in ‘weighting’ the results. Of course youngsters can teach older folks a thing or two and the reverse is equally true. Technology is not the sole province of any particular age group.

Rocky said...

Great Article. The times, they are a changin'

Trevor Gay said...

Indeed Rocky - hope you are well Amigo!

John O'Leary said...

Great article, Trevor.

Following on Dave's point about the importance of attracting great folks, here's an excellence article from BusinessWeek (my favorite business journal) that describes some innovative ways companies are now attracting and retaining talent: http://www.businessweek.com/magazine/content/06_38/b4001601.htm?chan=careers_first+jobs_top+story

In case this URL doesn't reproduce, google: BusinessWeek The Best Place to Launch a Career.

Marilyn said...

Hi Trevor,

Back from 'holiday' as you call it in the UK.

Wonderful article on the changes that tech is bringing us, and the 'new' workforce. I agree that technology is a powerful tool, and as Dick Field said, can literally save lives.

If I may, a short observation on how tech gives the consumer power. I had a health challenge two years ago, that was related to a medication I was taking. By going online I discovered this medication could very well have caused me to black out.

My doctor knew nothing of this--when presented with an article I'd printed out from a credible source, the medication was then changed, and no more problem for me. Doctors can't know it all,and luckily for me I knew how to research my problem.

P.S. I've now launched out as an independent consultant/speaker/coach. No more day job :)

Trevor Gay said...

Thanks for the article link John - retaining talent is more important than ever nowadays methinks

Marilyn - great news about you branching out on your own!! I'm sure you will be a great success – congratulations. It's a whole new world out there for you!

Keep us posted with your progress.

Richard Lipscombe said...

Trevor... I am a simple man who is learning to love the 'new' English Premier League Season.... What is there not to love about the score line Liverpool 2, Manchester United 1...

Trevor Gay said...

I will allow you your moment of glory this season Richard ... a mere temporary blip for my beloved United of course my friend :-)

David Wike said...

What a wonderful day yesterday! We had a great day out, the sun shone at last and normal service was resumed at Anfield. Simple pleasures indeed!

Trevor Gay said...

Hi David - I really don’t begrudge Liverpool fans some temporary much needed relief after falling so far behind United for so long.... We United fans are renowned charitable folks and we like to give to the poor.

I can imagine it is nice for Scousers to feel once again the happiness of winning against United after so long. You were probably a teenager when this last happened.

Remember it’s a marathon not a sprint ... The trophies are handed out in May not in September. Last season we were in an identical position after three games and we won the Premier League and European Champions League double as you know.

As you and Richard can tell.... I'm not bitter :-)

Enjoy your brief moment of glory my friend …

John O'Leary said...

Geez, you Brits are as obsessed with your football as we are about our politics.

Trevor Gay said...

Absolutely John - Bill Shankly the late Liverpool manager famously said;

'Football (soccer)is not a matter of life and death - it's far more important than that'

David Wike said...

John,

How come a nation allegedly obsessed with politics can elect such unsuitable people to the office of president with such regularity? Normally I would say that a nation’s politics is a matter for its own people, but with the US presidency it is quite important for the rest of us.

I am just hoping that common sense prevails and we are saved from McCain and that Palin woman. But based on history I’m not that hopeful. I don’t rate our present prime minister but at least he’s reasonably bright and isn’t dangerous.

Anyway, it’s good to see that a Manchester United supporter turns to a Liverpool manager when he needs a decent quote about football. Bill Shankley arrived at Liverpool in the late fifties and transformed the club from being a second rank team to being the finest in Europe. He did it by doing simple things, including being a passionate supporter of his front line, the players. He had very clear views on most things, including politicians. Another of his quotes was, “If you can't make decisions in life, you're a bloody menace. You'd be better becoming an MP.” (Member of Parliament).

Trevor Gay said...

‘He did it by doing simple things, including being a passionate supporter of his front line, the players.’

That is why I liked Shanks needless to say David.

John O'Leary said...

David, I plead guilty to your charge on behalf of all Americans.